Growing a Nation

Historical Timeline — 1910

Economic Cycles

1909-18
Prosperity and war boom

1914-18
World War I

 

 

Farm Economy

1910s
Farm credit is a steadily growing rural issue

1913
Federal Reserve Act passed

Farmers & the Land

1910
Total population: 91,972,266; farm population: 32,077,000 (est.); farmers 31% of labor force; Number of farms: 6,366,000; average acres: 138

1909-20
Dryland farming boom on the Great Plains

1911-17
Immigration of agricultural workers from Mexico

1916
Stock Raising Homestead Act

Farm Machinery & Technology

1910-19
Commercial fertilizer use: 6,116,700 tons/year

1910-15
Big open-geared gas tractors introduced in areas of extensive farming

1915-20
Enclosed gears developed for tractor

1918
Small prairie-type combine with auxiliary engine introduced

Crops & Livestock

1910
North Dakota, Kansas, and Minnesota chief wheat States; durum wheats become important commercial crops; 35 States and territories require tuberculin testing of all cattle entering

1910-20
Grain production reaches into the most arid sections of the Great Plains

1912
Marquis wheat introduced; Panama and Colombia sheep developed

1917
Kansas red wheat distributed

Transportation

1910-25
Road-building accompanies increased use of automobiles

1916
Railroad network peaks at 254,000 miles; Rural Post Roads Act begins regular Federal subsidies to road building

1917-20
Federal Government operates railroads during war emergency

Agricultural Trade & Development

1910-19
Agricultural exports: $1.9 billion/year or 45% of total exports

1913
USDA's Office of Markets established to promote farm marketing

Life on the Farm

Farm Organizations & Movements

1910
Farmers' Equity Union organized

1911
First Farm Bureau formed in Broome County, NY

1915
Non-Partisan League formed

1915-17
International Workers of the World ("Wobblies") organize thousands of wheat harvest workers

1919
American Farm Bureau Federation formally organized in Chicago, Illinois

Agricultural Education & Extension

1910
Thomas Hunt Morgan announces his theory of genes

1914
Edwin Broun Fred begins to supply cultures of nitrogen-fixing bacteria to growers of legumes for the purpose of increasing the plant's nitrogen fixing capacity

1914
Smith-Lever Extension Act passed. Establishment of the federal-state Extension Service was a major step in direct education for farmers

1917
Smith-Hughes Vocational Education Act passed

Government Programs & Policy

1912
Plant Quarantine Act

1914
Cotton Futures Act

1916
Federal Farm Loan Act

1917
Food Control and Production Acts

Back to Top